Welcome to another edition of the Curiosity Stop, our monthly social innovation roundup. This month’s selection is as diverse as ever, from an app which lets you share food with your neighbours, to a GPS tracker for children with autism. Some innovations will make you say “I wish I’d thought of that,” and others are guaranteed to ruffle your feathers. So, open your mind, fill up your coffee cup, and tuck in...

Are you put off by the price of innovation? Don’t be. The sheer range of examples in this report show that you don’t need a six-figure budget to innovate. Take TrollAid, a Facebook and Twitter campaign by charity Calais Action, who donate essentials to refugees. Sadly, the group gets trolled a lot, but it has found a creative solution to this. Every time a keyboard warrior gives Calais Action textual abuse, the group responds with a message asking people to donate to its crowdfunding page called ‘TrollAid’. Later it lets the troll know that they’ve helped raise money for refugees. Total cost of the campaign? Minimal. Raising money for refugees AND pissing off internet trolls? Priceless.

Our #TrollAid campaign is in The Independent! Remember, you can paste the #TrollAid link wherever you see a troll - and...

Posted by Calais Action on Thursday, January 28, 2016

The world just isn’t ready for some innovations, and Zum is one of those. Zum is Uber for kids. Or rather, Uber for busy parents. It’s an app dedicated to providing safe, on-demand car trips for children. Need someone to pick little Peggy up from her recorder lesson? Use the Zum app to send a stranger. Yes, really. Possibly even more outrageous is Babypod, a speaker which plays music to your unborn baby, from inside your vagina.

Zum

Others examples, like the Mobile Lorm Glove, have been a long time coming. Lorm is a tactile alphabet spelled out with strokes to the hand. It’s used by deaf-blind people as a way to communicate with others. Until recently, you could only use it when face-to-face with another person who had learnt Lorm. Enter, Berlin researcher Tom Bieling. He’s designed a glove with fabric pressure-sensors, which allows a deaf-blind person to communicate with anyone. Online messages are translated directly onto the glove, and the glove-wearer can reply using Lorm.

Lorm

This month, the Curiosity Stop team will be reporting live from SxSW. For the lowdown on what’s hot at the Interactive Festival, keep an eye on our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram channels for some real-time SxSW action. If you’re heading to Austin and fancy meeting up, we’d love to talk innovation over beers and brisket. I’ll leave the Babypod at home though...